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dc.contributor.authorMcCabe, Caitlin J.
dc.contributor.authorGoldie, Sue J.
dc.contributor.authorFisman, David N.
dc.contributor.authorLoutfy, Mona Rafik
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-10T16:06:27Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationMcCabe, Caitlin J., Sue J. Goldie, and David N. Fisman. 2010. The Cost-Effectiveness of Directly Observed Highly-Active Antiretroviral Therapy in the Third Trimester in HIV-Infected Pregnant Women. PLoS ONE 5(4): e10154.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4553218
dc.description.abstractBackground: In HIV-infected pregnant women, viral suppression prevents mother-to-child HIV transmission. Directly observed highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) enhances virological suppression, and could prevent transmission. Our objective was to project the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of directly observed administration of antiretroviral drugs in pregnancy. Methods and Findings: A mathematical model was created to simulate cohorts of one million asymptomatic HIV-infected pregnant women on HAART, with women randomly assigned self-administered or directly observed antiretroviral therapy (DOT), or no HAART, in a series of Monte Carlo simulations. Our primary outcome was the quality-adjusted life expectancy in years (QALY) of infants born to HIV-infected women, with the rates of Caesarean section and HIV-transmission after DOT use as intermediate outcomes. Both self-administered HAART and DOT were associated with decreased costs and increased life-expectancy relative to no HAART. The use of DOT was associated with a relative risk of HIV transmission of 0.39 relative to conventional HAART; was highly cost-effective in the cohort as a whole (cost-utility ratio $14,233 per QALY); and was cost-saving in women whose viral loads on self-administered HAART would have exceeded 1000 copies/ml. Results were stable in wide-ranging sensitivity analyses, with directly observed therapy cost-saving or highly cost-effective in almost all cases. Conclusions: Based on the best available data, programs that optimize adherence to HAART through direct observation in pregnancy have the potential to diminish mother-to-child HIV transmission in a highly cost-effective manner. Targeted use of DOT in pregnant women with high viral loads, who could otherwise receive self-administered HAART would be a cost-saving intervention. These projections should be tested with randomized clinical trials.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi://10.1371/journal.pone.0010154en_US
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2854147/pdf/en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.subjectevidence-based healthcareen_US
dc.subjectclinical decision-makingen_US
dc.subjectinfectious diseasesen_US
dc.subjectHIV infection and AIDSen_US
dc.subjectpublic health and epidemiologyen_US
dc.subjecthealth services research and economicsen_US
dc.titleThe Cost-Effectiveness of Directly Observed Highly-Active Antiretroviral Therapy in the Third Trimester in HIV-Infected Pregnant Womenen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalPLoS ONEen_US
dash.depositing.authorGoldie, Sue J.
dc.date.available2010-11-10T16:06:27Z
dash.affiliation.otherSPH^Health Policy and Managementen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0010154*
dash.authorsorderedfalse
dash.contributor.affiliatedGoldie, Sue


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