Comparison of Patient Comprehension of Rapid HIV Pre-Test Fundamentals by Information Delivery Format in an Emergency Department Setting

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Comparison of Patient Comprehension of Rapid HIV Pre-Test Fundamentals by Information Delivery Format in an Emergency Department Setting

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: Comparison of Patient Comprehension of Rapid HIV Pre-Test Fundamentals by Information Delivery Format in an Emergency Department Setting
Author: Merchant, Roland C; Gee, Erin M; Clark, Melissa A; Mayer, Kenneth Hugh; Seage, George R.; De Gruttola, Victor Gerard

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Merchant, Roland C., Erin M. Gee, Melissa A. Clark, Kenneth H. Mayer, George R. Seage, and Victor G. DeGruttola. 2007. Comparison of patient comprehension of rapid HIV pre-test fundamentals by information delivery format in an emergency department setting. BMC Public Health 7:238.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Background: Two trials were conducted to compare emergency department patient comprehension of rapid HIV pre-test information using different methods to deliver this information. Methods: Patients were enrolled for these two trials at a US emergency department between February 2005 and January 2006. In Trial One, patients were randomized to a no pre-test information or an in-person discussion arm. In Trial Two, a separate group of patients were randomized to an in-person discussion arm or a Tablet PC-based video arm. The video, "Do you know about rapid HIV testing?," and the in-person discussion contained identical Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-suggested pre-test information components as well as information on rapid HIV testing with OraQuick®. Participants were compared by information arm on their comprehension of the pre-test information by their score on a 26-item questionnaire using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results: In Trial One, 38 patients completed the no-information arm and 31 completed the in-person discussion arm. Of these 69 patients, 63.8% had twelve years or fewer of formal education and 66.7% had previously been tested for HIV. The mean score on the questionnaire for the in-person discussion arm was higher than for the no information arm (18.7 vs. 13.3, p ≤ 0.0001). In Trial Two, 59 patients completed the in-person discussion and 55 completed the video arms. Of these 114 patients, 50.9% had twelve years or fewer of formal education and 68.4% had previously been tested for HIV. The mean score on the questionnaire for the video arm was similar to the in-person discussion arm (20.0 vs. 19.2; p ≤ 0.33). Conclusion: The video "Do you know about rapid HIV testing?" appears to be an acceptable substitute for an in-person pre-test discussion on rapid HIV testing with OraQuick®. In terms of adequately informing ED patients about rapid HIV testing, either form of pre-test information is preferable than for patients to receive no pre-test information.
Published Version: doi:10.1186/1471-2458-7-238
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2080636/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4553343
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters