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dc.contributor.authorKalager, Mette
dc.contributor.authorHaldorsen, Tor
dc.contributor.authorBretthauer, Michael
dc.contributor.authorHoff, Geir
dc.contributor.authorThoresen, Steinar O
dc.contributor.authorAdami, Hans-Olov
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-16T15:10:17Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationKalager, Mette, Tor Haldorsen, Michael Bretthauer, Geir Hoff, Steinar O Thoresen, and Hans-Olov Adami. 2009. Improved breast cancer survival following introduction of an organized mammography screening program among both screened and unscreened women: a population-based cohort study. Breast Cancer Research : BCR 11(4): R44.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1465-5411en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4556039
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Mammography screening reduces breast cancer mortality through earlier diagnosis but may convey further benefit if screening is associated with optimized treatment through multidisciplinary medical care. In Norway, a national mammography screening program was introduced among women aged 50 to 69 years during 1995/6 to 2004. Also during this time, multidisciplinary breast cancer care units were implemented. Methods: We constructed three cohorts of breast cancer patients: 1) the pre-program group comprising women diagnosed and treated before mammography screening began in their county of residence, 2) the post-program group comprising women diagnosed and treated through multidisciplinary breast cancer care units in their county but before they had been invited to mammography screening; and 3) the screening group comprising women diagnosed and treated after invitation to screening. We calculated Kaplan-Meier plots and multivariable Cox proportional hazard models. Results: We studied 41,833 women with breast cancer. The nine-year breast cancer-specific survival rate was 0.66 (95%CI: 0.65 to 0.67) in the pre-program group; 0.72 (95%CI: 0.70 to 0.74) in the post-program group; and 0.84 (95%CI: 0.80 to 0.88) in the screening group. In multivariable analyses, the risk of death from breast cancer was 14% lower in the post-program group than in the pre-program group (hazard ratio 0.86; (95%CI: 0.78 to 0.95, P = 0.003)). Conclusions: After nine years follow-up, at least 33% of the improved survival is attributable to improved breast cancer management through multidisciplinary medical care.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi://10.1186/bcr2331en_US
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2750103/pdf/en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.titleImproved Breast Cancer Survival Following Introduction of an Organized Mammography Screening Program among Both Screened and Unscreened Women: A Population-Based Cohort Studyen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalBreast Cancer Research : BCRen_US
dash.depositing.authorAdami, Hans-Olov
dc.date.available2010-11-16T15:10:17Z
dash.affiliation.otherSPH^Epidemiologyen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/bcr2331*
dash.contributor.affiliatedKalager, Mette
dash.contributor.affiliatedBretthauer, Michael
dash.contributor.affiliatedAdami, Hans-Olov


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