Communication Inequalities, Social Determinants, and Intermittent Smoking in the 2003 Health Information National Trends Survey

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Communication Inequalities, Social Determinants, and Intermittent Smoking in the 2003 Health Information National Trends Survey

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Title: Communication Inequalities, Social Determinants, and Intermittent Smoking in the 2003 Health Information National Trends Survey
Author: Ackerson, Leland K.; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Ackerson, Leland K., and Kasisomayajula Viswanath. 2009. Communication inequalities, social determinants, and intermittent smoking in the 2003 Health Information National Trends Survey. Preventing Chronic Disease 6(2): A40.
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Abstract: Introduction: Intermittent smokers account for a large proportion of all smokers, and this trend is increasing. Social and communication inequalities may account for disparities in intermittent smoking status. Methods: Data for this study came from 2,641 ever-smokers from a 2003 nationally representative cross-sectional survey. Independent variables of interest included race/ethnicity, sex, household income, education, health media attention, and cancer-related beliefs. The outcome of interest was smoking status categorized as daily smoker, intermittent smoker, or former smoker. Analyses used 2 sets of multivariable logistic regressions to investigate the associations of covariates with intermittent smokers compared with former smokers and with daily smokers. Results: People with high education and high income, Spanish-speaking Hispanics, and women were the most likely to be intermittent rather than daily smokers. Women and Spanish-speaking Hispanics were the most likely to be intermittent rather than former smokers. Attention to health media sources increased the likelihood that a person would be an intermittent smoker instead of a former or daily smoker. Believing that damage from smoking is avoidable and irreversible was associated with lower odds of being an intermittent smoker rather than a former smoker but did not differentiate intermittent smoking from daily smoking. Conclusion: The results indicate that tailoring smoking-cessation campaigns toward intermittent smokers from specific demographic groups by using health media may improve the effect of these campaigns and reduce social health disparities.
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2687846/pdf/
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Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4569479
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