Signaling pathways required for macrophage scavenger receptor-mediated phagocytosis: analysis by scanning cytometry

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Signaling pathways required for macrophage scavenger receptor-mediated phagocytosis: analysis by scanning cytometry

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Title: Signaling pathways required for macrophage scavenger receptor-mediated phagocytosis: analysis by scanning cytometry
Author: Sulahian, Timothy H; Imrich, Amy; Winkler, Aaron R; Deloid, Glen M; Kobzik, Lester

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Citation: Sulahian, Timothy H., Amy Imrich, Glen DeLoid, Aaron R. Winkler, and Lester Kobzik. 2008. Signaling pathways required for macrophage scavenger receptor-mediated phagocytosis: analysis by scanning cytometry. Respiratory Research 9(1): 59.
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Abstract: Background: Scavenger receptors are important components of the innate immune system in the lung, allowing alveolar macrophages to bind and phagocytose numerous unopsonized targets. Mice with genetic deletions of scavenger receptors, such as SR-A and MARCO, are susceptible to infection or inflammation from inhaled pathogens or dusts. However, the signaling pathways required for scavenger receptor-mediated phagocytosis of unopsonized particles have not been characterized. Methods: We developed a scanning cytometry-based high-throughput assay of macrophage phagocytosis that quantitates bound and internalized unopsonized latex beads. This assay allowed the testing of a panel of signaling inhibitors which have previously been shown to target opsonin-dependent phagocytosis for their effect on unopsonized bead uptake by human in vitro-derived alveolar macrophage-like cells. The non-selective scavenger receptor inhibitor poly(I) and the actin destabilizer cytochalasin D were used to validate the assay and caused near complete abrogation of bead binding and internalization, respectively. Results: Microtubule destabilization using nocodazole dramatically inhibited bead internalization. Internalization was also significantly reduced by inhibitors of tyrosine kinases (genistein and herbimycin A), protein kinase C (staurosporine, chelerythrine chloride and Gö 6976), phosphoinositide-3 kinase (LY294002 and wortmannin), and the JNK and ERK pathways. In contrast, inhibition of phospholipase C by U-73122 had no effect. Conclusion: These data indicate the utility of scanning cytometry for the analysis of phagocytosis and that phagocytosis of unopsonized particles has both shared and distinct features when compared to opsonin-mediated phagocytosis.
Published Version: doi:10.1186/1465-9921-9-59
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2527561/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4874470
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