Elevated transaminases as a predictor of coma in a patient with anorexia nervosa: a case report and review of the literature

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Elevated transaminases as a predictor of coma in a patient with anorexia nervosa: a case report and review of the literature

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Title: Elevated transaminases as a predictor of coma in a patient with anorexia nervosa: a case report and review of the literature
Author: Shimada, Masahiko; Shimada, Katsunosuke; Yoshida, Shuhei; Kornek, Miroslaw Theodor; Kim, Seong-Jun; Schuppan, Detlef

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Citation: Yoshida, Shuhei, Masahiko Shimada, Miroslaw Kornek, Seong-Jun Kim, Katsunosuke Shimada, and Detlef Schuppan. 2010. Elevated transaminases as a predictor of coma in a patient with anorexia nervosa: a case report and review of the literature. Journal of Medical Case Reports 4: 307.
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Abstract: Introduction: Liver injury is a frequent complication associated with anorexia nervosa, and steatosis of the liver is thought to be the major underlying pathology. However, acute hepatic failure with transaminase levels over 1000 IU/mL and deep coma are very rare complications and the mechanism of pathogenesis is largely unknown. Case presentation: A 37-year-old Japanese woman showed features of acute liver failure and hepatic coma which were not associated with hypoglycemia or hyper-ammonemia. Our patient's consciousness was significantly improved with the recovery of liver function and normalization of transaminase levels after administration of nutritional support. Conclusions: Our case report demonstrates that transaminase levels had an inverse relationship with the consciousness of our patient, although the pathogenesis of coma remains largely unknown. This indicates that transaminase levels can be one of the key predictors of impending coma in patients with anorexia nervosa. Therefore, frequent monitoring of transaminase levels combined with rigorous treatment of the underlying nutritional deficiency and psychiatric disorder are necessary to prevent this severe complication.
Published Version: doi:10.1186/1752-1947-4-307
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2945359/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4874829
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