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dc.contributor.authorLin, Hsien-Ho
dc.contributor.authorEzzati, Majid
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Megan Blanche
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-28T05:56:10Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationLin, Hsien-Ho, Majid Ezzati, and Megan Murray. 2007. Tobacco smoke, indoor air pollution and tuberculosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis. PLoS Medicine 4(1): e20.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1549-1277en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4878936
dc.description.abstractBackground: Tobacco smoking, passive smoking, and indoor air pollution from biomass fuels have been implicated as risk factors for tuberculosis (TB) infection, disease, and death. Tobacco smoking and indoor air pollution are persistent or growing exposures in regions where TB poses a major health risk. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis to quantitatively assess the association between these exposures and the risk of infection, disease, and death from TB. Methods and Findings: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies reporting effect estimates and 95% confidence intervals on how tobacco smoking, passive smoke exposure, and indoor air pollution are associated with TB. We identified 33 papers on tobacco smoking and TB, five papers on passive smoking and TB, and five on indoor air pollution and TB. We found substantial evidence that tobacco smoking is positively associated with TB, regardless of the specific TB outcomes. Compared with people who do not smoke, smokers have an increased risk of having a positive tuberculin skin test, of having active TB, and of dying from TB. Although we also found evidence that passive smoking and indoor air pollution increased the risk of TB disease, these associations are less strongly supported by the available evidence. Conclusions: There is consistent evidence that tobacco smoking is associated with an increased risk of TB. The finding that passive smoking and biomass fuel combustion also increase TB risk should be substantiated with larger studies in future. TB control programs might benefit from a focus on interventions aimed at reducing tobacco and indoor air pollution exposures, especially among those at high risk for exposure to TB.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1371/journal.pmed.0040020en_US
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1769410/pdf/en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.subjectinfectious diseasesen_US
dc.subjectpublic health and epidemiologyen_US
dc.subjectpublic healthen_US
dc.subjectenvironmental healthen_US
dc.subjectsmokingen_US
dc.subjecttuberculosisen_US
dc.titleTobacco smoke, indoor air pollution and tuberculosis: a systematic review and meta-analysisen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalPLoS Medicineen_US
dash.depositing.authorMurray, Megan Blanche
dc.date.available2011-04-28T05:56:10Z
dash.affiliation.otherSPH^Global Health + Populationen_US
dash.affiliation.otherSPH^Epidemiologyen_US
dash.affiliation.otherHMS^Medicine-Brigham and Women's Hospitalen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pmed.0040020*
dash.contributor.affiliatedMurray, Megan
dash.contributor.affiliatedEzzati, Majid


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