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dc.contributor.authorCavallari, Jennifer Margaret
dc.contributor.authorEisen, Ellen A.
dc.contributor.authorFang, Shona C.
dc.contributor.authorSchwartz, Joel David
dc.contributor.authorHauser, Russ B.
dc.contributor.authorHerrick, Robert F.
dc.contributor.authorChristiani, David C.
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-01T04:27:08Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationCavallari, Jennifer M., Ellen A. Eisen, Shona C. Fang, Joel Schwartz, Russ Hauser, Robert F. Herrick, and David C. Christiani. 2008. PM\(_{2.5}\) metal exposures and nocturnal heart rate variability: a panel study of boilermaker construction workers. Environmental Health 7: 36.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1476-069Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4879858
dc.description.abstractBackground: To better understand the mechanism(s) of particulate matter (PM) associated cardiovascular effects, research priorities include identifying the responsible PM characteristics. Evidence suggests that metals play a role in the cardiotoxicity of fine PM (PM\(_{2.5}\)) and in exposure-related decreases in heart rate variability (HRV). We examined the association between daytime exposure to the metal content of PM\(_{2.5}\) and night HRV in a panel study of boilermaker construction workers exposed to metal-rich welding fumes. Methods: Twenty-six male workers were monitored by ambulatory electrocardiogram (ECG) on a workday while exposed to welding fume and a non-workday (baseline). From the ECG, rMSSD (square root of the mean squared differences of successive intervals) was summarized over the night (0:00–7:00). Workday, gravimetric PM\(_{2.5}\) samples were analyzed by x-ray fluorescence to determine metal content. We used linear mixed effects models to assess the associations between night rMSSD and PM\(_{2.5}\) metal exposures both with and without adjustment for total PM\(_{2.5}\). Matched ECG measurements from the non-workday were used to control for individual cardiac risk factors and models were also adjusted for smoking status. To address collinearity between PM\(_{2.5}\) and metal content, we used a two-step approach that treated the residuals from linear regression models of each metal on PM\(_{2.5}\) as surrogates for the differential effects of metal exposures in models for night rMSSD. Results: The median PM\(_{2.5}\) exposure was 650 μg/m\(^3\); median metal exposures for iron, manganese, aluminum, copper, zinc, chromium, lead, and nickel ranged from 226 μg/m\(^3\) to non-detectable. We found inverse linear associations in exposure-response models with increased metal exposures associated with decreased night rMSSD. A statistically significant association for manganese was observed, with a decline of 0.130 msec (95% CI: -0.162, -0.098) in night rMSSD for every 1 μg/m\(^3\) increase in manganese. However, even after adjusting for individual metals, increases in total PM\(_{2.5}\) exposures were associated with declines in night rMSSD. Conclusion: These results support the cardiotoxicity of PM\(_{2.5}\) metal exposures, specifically manganese. However the metal component alone did not account for the observed declines in night HRV. Therefore, results suggest the importance of other PM elemental components.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1186/1476-069X-7-36en_US
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2481261/pdf/en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.titlePM\(_{2.5}\) metal exposures and nocturnal heart rate variability: a panel study of boilermaker construction workersen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalEnvironmental Healthen_US
dash.depositing.authorCavallari, Jennifer Margaret
dc.date.available2011-05-01T04:27:08Z
dash.affiliation.otherSPH^Environmental+Occupational Medicine+Epien_US
dash.affiliation.otherSPH^Environmental+Occupational Medicine+Epien_US
dash.affiliation.otherHMS^Medicine-Brigham and Women's Hospitalen_US
dash.affiliation.otherSPH^Exposure Epidemiology and Risk Programen_US
dash.affiliation.otherHMS^Obstetrics Gynecology and Repro. Bio. - MGHen_US
dash.affiliation.otherSPH^Environmental+Occupational Medicine+Epien_US
dash.affiliation.otherSPH^Exposure Epidemiology and Risk Programen_US
dash.affiliation.otherHMS^Medicine-Massachusetts General Hospitalen_US
dash.affiliation.otherSPH^Environmental+Occupational Medicine+Epien_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1476-069X-7-36*
dash.contributor.affiliatedCavallari, Jennifer M
dash.contributor.affiliatedEisen, Ellen
dash.contributor.affiliatedHerrick, Robert
dash.contributor.affiliatedChristiani, David
dash.contributor.affiliatedHauser, Russ
dash.contributor.affiliatedFang, Shona C
dash.contributor.affiliatedSchwartz, Joel


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