Pesticide spraying for West Nile virus control and emergency department asthma visits in New York City, 2000

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Pesticide spraying for West Nile virus control and emergency department asthma visits in New York City, 2000

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dc.contributor.author Karpati, Adam M.
dc.contributor.author Perrin, Mary C.
dc.contributor.author Matte, Tom
dc.contributor.author Leighton, Jessica
dc.contributor.author Barr, R. Graham
dc.contributor.author Schwartz, Joel David
dc.date.accessioned 2011-05-11T03:22:10Z
dc.date.issued 2004
dc.identifier.citation Karpati, Adam M., Mary C. Perrin, Tom Matte, Jessica Leighton, Joel Schwartz, and R. Graham Barr. 2004. Pesticide spraying for West Nile virus control and emergency department asthma visits in New York City, 2000. Environmental Health Perspectives 112(11): 1183-1187. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0091-6765 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4887127
dc.description.abstract Pyrethroid pesticides were applied via ground spraying to residential neighborhoods in New York City during July–September 2000 to control mosquito vectors of West Nile virus (WNV). Case reports link pyrethroid exposure to asthma exacerbations, but population-level effects on asthma from large-scale mosquito control programs have not been assessed. We conducted this analysis to determine whether widespread urban pyrethroid pesticide use was associated with increased rates of emergency department (ED) visits for asthma. We recorded the dates and locations of pyrethroid spraying during the 2000 WNV season in New York City and tabulated all ED visits for asthma to public hospitals from October 1999 through November 2000 by date and ZIP code of patients’ residences. The association between pesticide application and asthma-related emergency visits was evaluated across date and ZIP code, adjusting for season, day of week, and daily temperature, precipitation, particulate, and ozone levels. There were 62,827 ED visits for asthma during the 14-month study period, across 162 ZIP codes. The number of asthma visits was similar in the 3-day periods before and after spraying (510 vs. 501, p = 0.78). In multivariate analyses, daily rates of asthma visits were not associated with pesticide spraying (rate ratio = 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.80–1.07). Secondary analyses among children and for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease yielded similar null results. This analysis shows that spraying pyrethroids for WNV control in New York City was not followed by population-level increases in public hospital ED visit rates for asthma. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher National Institue of Environmental Health Sciences en_US
dc.relation.isversionof doi:10.1289/ehp.6946 en_US
dc.relation.hasversion http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1247479/pdf/ en_US
dash.license LAA
dc.subject asthma en_US
dc.subject obstructive airway disease en_US
dc.subject ozone en_US
dc.subject particulates en_US
dc.subject pesticides en_US
dc.subject pollutants en_US
dc.subject pyrethroids en_US
dc.subject West Nile virus en_US
dc.title Pesticide spraying for West Nile virus control and emergency department asthma visits in New York City, 2000 en_US
dc.type Journal Article en_US
dc.description.version Version of Record en_US
dc.relation.journal Environmental Health Perspectives en_US
dash.depositing.author Schwartz, Joel David
dc.date.available 2011-05-11T03:22:10Z
dash.affiliation.other HMS^Medicine-Brigham and Women's Hospital en_US
dash.affiliation.other SPH^Exposure Epidemiology and Risk Program en_US

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