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dc.contributor.authorTsaih, Shirng-Wern
dc.contributor.authorKorrick, Susan Abigail
dc.contributor.authorSchwartz, Joel David
dc.contributor.authorAmarasiriwardena, Chitra J.
dc.contributor.authorAro, Antonio
dc.contributor.authorSparrow, David
dc.contributor.authorHu, Howard
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-15T21:50:38Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationTsaih, Shirng-Wern, Susan Korrick, Joel Schwartz, Chitra Amarasiriwardena, Antonio Aro, David Sparrow, and Howard Hu. 2004. Lead, Diabetes, Hypertension, and Renal Function: The Normative Aging Study. Environmental Health Perspectives 112(11): 1178-1182.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0091-6765en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4889506
dc.description.abstractIn this prospective study, we examined changes in renal function during 6 years of follow-up in relation to baseline lead levels, diabetes, and hypertension among 448 middle-age and elderly men, a subsample of the Normative Aging Study. Lead levels were generally low at baseline, with mean blood lead, patella lead, and tibia lead values of 6.5 μg/dL, 32.4 μg/g, and 21.5 μg/g, respectively. Six percent and 26% of subjects had diabetes and hypertension at baseline, respectively. In multivariate-adjusted regression analyses, longitudinal increases in serum creatinine (SCr) were associated with higher baseline lead levels but these associations were not statistically significant. However, we observed significant interactions of blood lead and tibia lead with diabetes in predicting annual change in SCr. For example, increasing the tibia lead level from the midpoints of the lowest to the highest quartiles (9–34 μg/g) was associated with an increase in the rate of rise in SCr that was 17.6-fold greater in diabetics than in nondiabetics (1.08 mg/dL/10 years vs. 0.062 mg/dL/10 years; p < 0.01). We also observed significant interactions of blood lead and tibia lead with diabetes in relation to baseline SCr levels (tibia lead only) and follow-up SCr levels. A significant interaction of tibia lead with hypertensive status in predicting annual change in SCr was also observed. We conclude that longitudinal decline of renal function among middle-age and elderly individuals appears to depend on both long-term lead stores and circulating lead, with an effect that is most pronounced among diabetics and hypertensives, subjects who likely represent particularly susceptible groups.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherNational Institue of Environmental Health Sciencesen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1289/ehp.7024en_US
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1247478/pdf/en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.subjectblood leaden_US
dc.subjectbone leaden_US
dc.subjectdiabetesen_US
dc.subjecthypertensionen_US
dc.subjectkidney functionen_US
dc.subjectserum creatinineen_US
dc.titleLead, Diabetes, Hypertension, and Renal Function: The Normative Aging Studyen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalEnvironmental Health Perspectivesen_US
dash.depositing.authorKorrick, Susan Abigail
dc.date.available2011-05-15T21:50:38Z
dash.affiliation.otherHMS^Medicine-Brigham and Women's Hospitalen_US
dash.affiliation.otherSPH^Environmental+Occupational Medicine+Epien_US
dash.affiliation.otherHMS^Medicine-Brigham and Women's Hospitalen_US
dash.affiliation.otherSPH^Exposure Epidemiology and Risk Programen_US
dash.affiliation.otherHMS^Medicine-Brigham and Women's Hospitalen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1289/ehp.7024*
dash.contributor.affiliatedKorrick, Susan
dash.contributor.affiliatedAmarasiriwardena, Chitra
dash.contributor.affiliatedSparrow, David
dash.contributor.affiliatedSchwartz, Joel
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-2557-150X


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