Now showing items 1-20 of 24

    • Ancient Upcycling: Social Memory and the Reuse of Marble in Athens 

      Rous, Sarah Adler (2016-05-10)
      In this dissertation I examine the various ways Athenians of several periods of antiquity purposefully reused stone artifacts, objects, and buildings in order to shape their own and their descendants’ collective ideas about ...
    • Arma virumque: The Significance of Spoils in Roman Culture 

      Katz, Rebecca Aileen (2016-05-17)
      This dissertation explores the significance of spoils and the practice of spoils-taking in Roman culture. Working from the premise that spoils in the classical sense (Latin spolia, exuviae) are items singled out for their ...
    • Between Federation and Empire: The koina of the imperial Greek mainland, 1st to 3rd century CE 

      Gettel, Eliza (2019-09-10)
      This dissertation uncovers the dynamism and durability of koina in the Greek mainland within the Roman empire. The term koinon translates from ancient Greek as ‘what is common, shared, or public.’ However, scholars often ...
    • Contesting the Greek Past in Ninth-Century Baghdad 

      Connelly, Coleman (2016-05-16)
      From the eighth century through the tenth, the ‘Abbāsid capital of Baghdad witnessed the translation, in unprecedented numbers, of Greek philosophical, medical, and other scientific texts into Arabic, often via a Syriac ...
    • Deliberative Fictions: Isocrates' Assembly Speeches 

      Mellen, Gregory Robert (2018-05-11)
      This dissertation is a study of four works by the Athenian teacher and writer Isocrates: Plataicus, Archidamus, Areopagiticus, and On the Peace. In each of these works, a fictitious orator addresses an internal audience ...
    • The Great Mystery: Death, Memory and the Archiving of Monastic Culture in Late Antique Religious Tales 

      Dirkse, Saskia (2015-05-15)
      The present study investigates attitudes towards and teachings about the end of life and the soul’s passage to the next world, as expressed in late antique religious tales in Greek, particularly from Egypt and the Sinai. ...
    • Horace and the Ancient Grotesque 

      Townshend, James Raynham (2018-01-19)
      This dissertation examines the grotesque as both a concept and a phenomenon in the work of the poet Horace. Horace is a key figure in the development of theories of the grotesque, but this aspect of his work has not been ...
    • Invention and Discovery in Greek and Roman Thought 

      Romani Mistretta, Marco (2018-04-27)
      Straddling the disciplinary boundaries between ancient philosophy, history of science, literary criticism, and intellectual history, this dissertation focuses on the idea of invention and discovery in Classical antiquity. ...
    • Latin Literature and Frankish Culture in the Crusader States (1098–1187) 

      Yolles, Julian Jay Theodore (2015-05-15)
      The so-called Crusader States established by European settlers in the Levant at the end of the eleventh century gave rise to a variety of Latin literary works, including historiography, sermons, pilgrim guides, monastic ...
    • The Measure of All Things: Natural Hierarchy in Roman Republican Thought 

      Nickerson, Erika Lawren (2015-04-30)
      This work explores how writers of the late Roman Republic use the concept of nature rhetorically, in order to talk about and either reinforce or challenge social inequality. Comparisons between humans and animals receive ...
    • Medical Decision Making in Greco-Roman Antiquity 

      van Schaik, Katherine Douglas (2018-05-10)
      This project investigates medical decision making in Greco-Roman antiquity, using modern studies of cognitive bias, heuristics, and the development of expert intuition as a lens through which to view the theoretical ...
    • Medicine and Cosmology in Classical Greece: First Principles in Early Greek Medicine 

      Camden, David Hayden (2016-09-06)
      In the fifth and fourth centuries BCE, a number of “doctor-cosmologists” attempted to base the art of healing on the elements, laws, and fundamental forces that govern the universe as a whole. This study examines the major ...
    • Pindaric Aspects of Ovid's Metamorphoses 

      Lannom, Sarah Case (2016-05-10)
      This dissertation analyzes Ovid’s Metamorphoses through the lens of praise and blame poetry and focuses on Pindar and possible allusions to epinician poetry. In particular, I look at the Apollo and Daphne episode (Met. ...
    • Public Discourse and Imperial Ideology in the Annals of Tacitus 

      Konieczny, Michael Leonard (2019-05-10)
      This study examines the relationship between discourse and ideology in the Annals of the Roman historian Tacitus, with a particular focus on the account of the reign of Tiberius in books 1-6. I argue that Tacitus depicts ...
    • Reciting the Nation: Nikolaos Loukanes and the Poetics of a Renaissance Epos 

      Dourou, Calliopi (2019-01-20)
      My dissertation focuses on Nikolaos Loukanes’ s 1526 Iliad, the first printed rendition of Homer’s masterpiece in a modern language, and fully explores the untapped hermeneutic potentials of this intriguing yet only partially ...
    • Redeeming Epic: Furor, Classical Tradition, and Christian Cosmos in Late Antiquity 

      Flatt, Tyler (2016-11-29)
      This dissertation investigates the renewal and redefinition of the Vergilian epic tradition, as represented by the furor-theme, in the biblical epics of late antiquity. The Christian project of redeeming the most prestigious ...
    • The Roman Odysseus 

      Miller, Rebecca Anne (2015-05-08)
      This dissertation investigates how Roman authors, especially of the Augustan period, comment on their literary relationship with their Greek literary predecessors through the complex character of Odysseus. It argues that ...
    • Roman Political Economy and Legal Change: The Effects of Empire on Property in Roman Law 

      Bartlett, Charles Frederick (2017-09-08)
      This dissertation presents a series of four cases studies in order to argue that the administration of empire rather than self-referential juristic thought or practice determined the broad outlines of res in Roman law. ...
    • The Mortal Divine: Callimachus and the Making of an Imperial Theology 

      Park, Monica Sungahe (2018-05-14)
      This dissertation investigates the role of theological discourse in the making of the mortal divine in early Ptolemaic Alexandria by exploring the ways in which literary transcripts—particularly the text of Callimachus—complicate ...
    • The Other Classical Body: Cupids as Mediators in Roman Visual Culture 

      Mitchell, Elizabeth (2018-09-16)
      The myriad cupids of Roman visual culture typically attract one of two responses: either they are seen as replicates of the god of love, Eros or Amor, or they fade into the background as ornamental bodies so banal that ...