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dc.contributor.authorHedley-Whyte, John
dc.contributor.authorMilamed, Debra
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-29T05:18:09Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.citationHedley-Whyte, J., and D. R. Milamed. 2006. The evolution of sites of surgery. The Ulster medical journal 75(1): 46-53.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0041-6193en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:5355099
dc.description.abstractThe shift to ambulatory surgery has taken decades. The history and causation of the move are complex. Key enablers are recounted. The complex interchange of ideas, and physicians, between Belfast and Boston was important in the development of relevant facilitating standards. US and UK governmental and hospital statistics in the increase of ambulatory surgery are presented. The transition of surgery away from hospitals was not all plain-sailing. Insurance companies, governments and hospital administrators hindered and then acquiesced. The shift to ambulatory surgery has not resulted in increased patient morbidity and mortality.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe Ulster Medical Societyen_US
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1891798/pdf/en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.titleThe Evolution of Sites of Surgeryen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalThe Ulster medical journalen_US
dash.depositing.authorHedley-Whyte, John
dc.date.available2011-11-29T05:18:09Z
dash.affiliation.otherHMS^Anaesthesia-Brigham and Women's Hospitalen_US
dash.affiliation.otherHMS^Anaesthesia-Brigham and Women's Hospitalen_US
dash.contributor.affiliatedHedley-Whyte, John
dash.contributor.affiliatedMilamed, Debra


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