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dc.contributor.authorKim, Jee Young
dc.contributor.authorWand, Matthew P
dc.contributor.authorHauser, Russ B.
dc.contributor.authorMukherjee, Sutapa
dc.contributor.authorHerrick, Robert F.
dc.contributor.authorChristiani, David C.
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-03T23:00:58Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.citationKim, Jee Young, Matthew P. Wand, Russ Hauser, Sutapa Mukherjee, Robert F. Herrick, and David C. Christiani. 2003. Association of expired nitric oxide with occupational particulate exposure. Environmental Health Perspectives 111(5): 676-680.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0091-6765en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:6177596
dc.description.abstractParticulate air pollution has been associated with adverse respiratory health effects. This study assessed the utility of expired nitric oxide to detect acute airway responses to metal-containing fine particulates. Using a repeated-measures study design, we investigated the association between the fractional concentration of expired nitric oxide (F\(_E\)NO) and exposure to particulate matter with an aerodynamic mass median diameter of less than or equal to 2.5 micro m (PM\(_{2.5}\)) in boilermakers exposed to residual oil fly ash and metal fumes. Subjects were monitored for 5 days during boiler repair overhauls in 1999 (n = 20) or 2000 (n = 14). The Wilcoxon median baseline F\(_E\)NO was 10.6 ppb [95% confidence interval (CI): 9.1, 12.7] in 1999 and 7.4 ppb (95% CI: 6.7, 8.0) in 2000. The Wilcoxon median PM\(_{2.5}\) 8-hr time-weighted average was 0.56 mg/m(3) (95% CI: 0.37, 0.93) in 1999 and 0.86 mg/m(3) (95% CI: 0.65, 1.07) in 2000. F\(_E\)NO levels during the work week were significantly lower than baseline F\(_E\)NO in 1999 (p < 0.001). A significant inverse exposure-response relationship between log-transformed F\(_E\)NO and the previous workday's PM\(_{2.5}\) concentration was found in 1999, after adjusting for smoking status, age, and sampling year. With each 1 mg/m\(^3\) incremental increase in PM\(_{2.5}\) exposure, log F\(_E\)NO decreased by 0.24 (95% CI: -0.38, -0.10) in 1999. The lack of an exposure-response relationship between PM\(_{2.5}\) exposure and F\(_E\)NO in 2000 could be attributable to exposure misclassification resulting from the use of respirators. In conclusion, occupational exposure to metal-containing fine particulates was associated with significant decreases in F\(_E\)NO in a survey of workers with limited respirator usage.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1289/ehp.5880en_US
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1241474/pdf/en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.subjectair pollutantsen_US
dc.subjectepidemiologyen_US
dc.subjectnitric oxideen_US
dc.subjectoccupationalen_US
dc.subjectparticulate matteren_US
dc.titleAssociation of Expired Nitric Oxide with Occupational Particulate Exposureen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalEnvironmental Health Perspectivesen_US
dash.depositing.authorHauser, Russ B.
dc.date.available2012-01-03T23:00:58Z
dash.affiliation.otherHMS^Obstetrics Gynecology and Repro. Bio. - MGHen_US
dash.affiliation.otherSPH^Environmental+Occupational Medicine+Epien_US
dash.affiliation.otherSPH^Exposure Epidemiology and Risk Programen_US
dash.affiliation.otherHMS^Medicine-Massachusetts General Hospitalen_US
dash.affiliation.otherSPH^Environmental+Occupational Medicine+Epien_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1289/ehp.5880*
dash.contributor.affiliatedHauser, Russ
dash.contributor.affiliatedHerrick, Robert
dash.contributor.affiliatedChristiani, David


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