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dc.contributor.authorSchwartz, Joel David
dc.contributor.authorLaden, Francine
dc.contributor.authorZanobetti, Antonella
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-22T01:45:22Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.citationSchwartz, Joel, Francine Laden, and Antonella Zanobetti. 2002. The concentration-response relation between PM\(_{2.5}\) and daily deaths. Environmental Health Perspectives 110(10): 1025-1029.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0091-6765en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:8000921
dc.description.abstractParticulate air pollution at commonly occurring concentrations is associated with daily deaths. Recent attention has focused on the shape of the concentration-response curve, particularly at low doses. Several recent articles have reported that particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter \(\leq 10 \mu\)m PM\(_{10}\)) was associated with daily deaths with no evidence of a threshold. These reports have used smoothing or spline methods in individual cities and pooled the results across multiple cities to obtain estimates that are more robust. To date, fine particulate matter (aerodynamic diameter \(\leq 2.5 \mu\)m; PM\(_{2.5}\)), a component of PM\(_{10}\), has not been examined in this regard. We examined this association in a hierarchical model in six U.S. cities. In the first stage, we fit log-linear models including smooth functions of PM\(_{2.5}\) in each city, controlling for season, weather, and day of the week. These smooth functions allowed for nonlinearities in the city-specific associations. We combined the estimated curves across cities using a hierarchical model that allows for heterogeneity. We found an essentially linear relationship down to 2 \(\mu\)g/m\(_3\). The same approach was applied to examine the concentration response to traffic particles, controlling for particles from other sources. Once again, the association showed no sign of a threshold. The magnitude of the association suggests that controlling fine particle pollution would result in thousands of fewer early deaths per year.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherNational Institute of Environmental Health Sciencesen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://ehp03.niehs.nih.gov/home.actionen_US
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1241029/pdf/en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.subjectmeta-analysisen_US
dc.subjectmortalityen_US
dc.subjectparticulate air pollutionen_US
dc.subjectsmoothingen_US
dc.subjecttime seriesen_US
dc.subjecttrafficen_US
dc.titleThe Concentration-Response Relation Between PM\(_{2.5}\) and Daily Deaths.en_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalEnvironmental Health Perspectivesen_US
dash.depositing.authorSchwartz, Joel David
dc.date.available2012-01-22T01:45:22Z
dash.affiliation.otherHMS^Medicine-Brigham and Women's Hospitalen_US
dash.affiliation.otherSPH^Exposure Epidemiology and Risk Programen_US
dash.affiliation.otherHMS^Medicine-Brigham and Women's Hospitalen_US
dash.affiliation.otherSPH^Exposure Epidemiology and Risk Programen_US
dash.affiliation.otherSPH^Exposure Epidemiology and Risk Programen_US
dash.contributor.affiliatedZanobetti, Antonella
dash.contributor.affiliatedLaden, Francine
dash.contributor.affiliatedSchwartz, Joel
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-2813-2174
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-2557-150X


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