Training in Childhood Obesity Management in the United States: A Survey of Pediatric, Internal Medicine-pediatrics and Family Medicine Residency Program Directors

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Training in Childhood Obesity Management in the United States: A Survey of Pediatric, Internal Medicine-pediatrics and Family Medicine Residency Program Directors

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Title: Training in Childhood Obesity Management in the United States: A Survey of Pediatric, Internal Medicine-pediatrics and Family Medicine Residency Program Directors
Author: Wolff, Margaret S; Rhodes, Erinn Thoyer; Ludwig, David Samuel

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Citation: Wolff, Margaret S, Erinn T Rhodes, and David S Ludwig. 2010. Training in childhood obesity management in the United States: a survey of pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics and family medicine residency program directors. BMC Medical Education 10: 18.
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Abstract: Background: Information about the availability and effectiveness of childhood obesity training during residency is limited. Methods: We surveyed residency program directors from pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics (IM-Peds), and family medicine residency programs between September 2007 and January 2008 about childhood obesity training offered in their programs. Results: The response rate was 42.2% (299/709) and ranged by specialty from 40.1% to 45.4%. Overall, 52.5% of respondents felt that childhood obesity training in residency was extremely important, and the majority of programs offered training in aspects of childhood obesity management including prevention (N = 240, 80.3%), diagnosis (N = 282, 94.3%), diagnosis of complications (N = 249, 83.3%), and treatment (N = 242, 80.9%). However, only 18.1% (N = 54) of programs had a formal childhood obesity curriculum with variability across specialties. Specifically, 35.5% of IM-Peds programs had a formal curriculum compared to only 22.6% of pediatric and 13.9% of family medicine programs (p < 0.01). Didactic instruction was the most commonly used training method but was rated as only somewhat effective by 67.9% of respondents using this method. The most frequently cited significant barrier to implementing childhood obesity training was competing curricular demands (58.5%). Conclusions: While most residents receive training in aspects of childhood obesity management, deficits may exist in training quality with a minority of programs offering a formal childhood obesity curriculum. Given the high prevalence of childhood obesity, a greater emphasis should be placed on development and use of effective training strategies suitable for all specialties training physicians to care for children.
Published Version: doi://10.1186/1472-6920-10-18
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2839969/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:8063394
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