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dc.contributor.authorSavoia, Elena
dc.contributor.authorStoto, Michael A.
dc.contributor.authorBiddinger, Paul D.
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Paul H.
dc.contributor.authorViswanath, Kasisomayajula
dc.contributor.authorKoh, Howard K
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-12T04:40:04Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationSavoia, Elena, Michael A Stoto, Paul D Biddinger, Paul Campbell, Kasisomayajula Viswanath, and Howard Koh. 2008. Risk-communication capability for public health emergencies varies by community diversity. BMC Research Notes 1: 6.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1756-0500en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:8156566
dc.description.abstractBackground: Public health emergencies heighten several challenges in risk-communication: providing trustworthy sources of information, reaching marginalized populations, and minimizing fear and public confusion. In emergencies, however, information may not diffuse equally among all social groups, and gaps in knowledge may increase. Such knowledge gaps vary by social structure and the size, socioeconomic status, and diversity of the population. This study explores the relationship between risk-communication capabilities, as perceived by public officials participating in emergency tabletop exercises, and community size and diversity. Findings: For each of the three communication functions tested, risk-communication capabilities are perceived to be greater in communities with fewer then 10% of the population speaking a language other than English at home, decreasing as the percentage grows to 20% (ANOVA P ≤ 0.02). With respect to community size, however, we found an N-shaped relationship between perceived risk communication capabilities and population size. Capabilities are perceived highest in the largest communities and lowest in the smallest, but lower in communities with 20,000–49,999 inhabitants compared to those with 2,500–19,999. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest the need to factor population diversity into risk communication plans and the need for improved state or regional risk-communication capabilities, especially for communities with limited local capacity.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi://10.1186/1756-0500-1-6en_US
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2518279/pdf/en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.titleRisk-communication Capability for Public Health Emergencies Varies by Community Diversityen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalBMC Research Notesen_US
dash.depositing.authorSavoia, Elena
dc.date.available2012-02-12T04:40:04Z
dash.affiliation.otherSPH^Public Hlth Practice/Govt and Community Programsen_US
dash.affiliation.otherSPH^Health Policy and Managementen_US
dash.affiliation.otherHMS^Surgery-Massachusetts General Hospitalen_US
dash.affiliation.otherSPH^Health Systems Groupen_US
dash.affiliation.otherSPH^Society Human Development and Healthen_US
dash.affiliation.otherSPH^Public Hlth Practice/Govt and Community Programsen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1756-0500-1-6*
dash.contributor.affiliatedStoto, Michael
dash.contributor.affiliatedCampbell Jr, Paul
dash.contributor.affiliatedSavoia, Elena
dash.contributor.affiliatedBiddinger, Paul
dash.contributor.affiliatedKoh, Howard
dash.contributor.affiliatedViswanath, Kasisomayajula


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