Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDelaney, Nigel F.
dc.contributor.authorBalenger, Susan
dc.contributor.authorBonneaud, Camille
dc.contributor.authorMarx, Christopher J
dc.contributor.authorHill, Geoffrey E.
dc.contributor.authorFerguson-Noel, Naola
dc.contributor.authorTsai, Peter Tzu-shin
dc.contributor.authorRodrigo, Allen
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, Scott V.
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-03T17:43:30Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationDelaney, Nigel F., Susan Balenger, Camille Bonneaud, Christopher J. Marx, Geoffrey E. Hill, Naola Ferguson-Noel, Peter Tsai, Allen Rodrigo, and Scott V. Edwards. 2012. Ultrafast evolution and loss of CRISPRs following a host shift in a novel wildlife pathogen, Mycoplasma gallisepticum. PLoS Genetics 8(2): e1002511.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1553-7390en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:8497448
dc.description.abstractMeasureable rates of genome evolution are well documented in human pathogens but are less well understood in bacterial pathogens in the wild, particularly during and after host switches. \(Mycoplasma\) \(gallisepticum\) (MG) is a pathogenic bacterium that has evolved predominantly in poultry and recently jumped to wild house finches \((Carpodacus\) \(mexicanus\)), a common North American songbird. For the first time we characterize the genome and measure rates of genome evolution in House Finch isolates of MG, as well as in poultry outgroups. Using whole-genome sequences of 12 House Finch isolates across a 13-year serial sample and an additional four newly sequenced poultry strains, we estimate a nucleotide diversity in House Finch isolates of only \(\sim2\%\) of ancestral poultry strains and a nucleotide substitution rate of \(0.8−1.2\times10^{−5}\) per site per year both in poultry and in House Finches, an exceptionally fast rate rivaling some of the highest estimates reported thus far for bacteria. We also found high diversity and complete turnover of CRISPR arrays in poultry MG strains prior to the switch to the House Finch host, but after the invasion of House Finches there is progressive loss of CRISPR repeat diversity, and recruitment of novel CRISPR repeats ceases. Recent (2007) House Finch MG strains retain only \(\sim50\%\) of the CRISPR repertoire founding (1994–95) strains and have lost the CRISPR–associated genes required for CRISPR function. Our results suggest that genome evolution in bacterial pathogens of wild birds can be extremely rapid and in this case is accompanied by apparent functional loss of CRISPRs.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipOrganismic and Evolutionary Biologyen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1002511en_US
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3276549/pdf/en_US
dash.licenseOAP
dc.subjectbiologyen_US
dc.subjectevolutionary biologyen_US
dc.subjectmicrobiologyen_US
dc.subjectpopulation biologyen_US
dc.subjectzoologyen_US
dc.titleUltrafast Evolution and Loss of CRISPRs Following a Host Shift in a Novel Wildlife Pathogen, Mycoplasma gallisepticumen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalPLoS Geneticsen_US
dash.depositing.authorEdwards, Scott V.
dc.date.available2012-04-03T17:43:30Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pgen.1002511*
dash.contributor.affiliatedTsai, Peter Tzu-shin
dash.contributor.affiliatedEdwards, Scott
dash.contributor.affiliatedMarx, Christopher J


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record