Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPuleo, Elaine
dc.contributor.authorOstroff, Jamie
dc.contributor.authorLevy, Andrea Gurmankin
dc.contributor.authorSprunck-Harrild, Kim
dc.contributor.authorGreenberg, Mark Steven
dc.contributor.authorDiller, Lisa Robin
dc.contributor.authorEmmons, Karen Maria
dc.contributor.authorde Moor, Janet S.
dc.contributor.authorHodgson, David C.
dc.contributor.authorFord, Jennifer S.
dc.contributor.authorTyc, Vida L.
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-15T18:53:43Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationde Moor, Janet S., Elaine Puleo, Jennifer S. Ford, Mark Steven Greenberg, David C. Hodgson, Vida L. Tyc, Jamie Ostroff, et al. 2011. Disseminating a smoking cessation intervention to childhood and young adult cancer survivors: Baseline characteristics and study design of the partnership for health-2 study. BMC Cancer 11: 165.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1471-2407en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:8581106
dc.description.abstractBackground: Partnership for Health-2 (PFH-2) is a web-based version of Partnership for Health, an evidence-based smoking cessation intervention for childhood cancer survivors. This paper describes the PFH-2 intervention and baseline data collection. Methods: 374 childhood and young adult cancer survivors were recruited from five cancer centers and participated in the baseline assessment. At baseline, participants completed measures of their smoking behavior, self-efficacy and stage of change for quitting smoking as well as psychological and environmental factors that could impact their smoking behavior. Results: At baseline, 93% of survivors smoked in the past seven days; however, 89% smoked a pack or less during this period. Forty-seven percent were nicotine dependent, and 55% had made at least one quit attempt in the previous year. Twenty-two percent of survivors were in contemplation for quitting smoking; of those 45% were somewhat or very confident that they could quit within six months. Sixty-three percent were in preparation for quitting smoking; however, they had relatively low levels of confidence that they could quit smoking in the next month. In multivariate analyses, stage of change, self-efficacy, social support for smoking cessation, smoking policy at work and home, fear of cancer recurrence, perceived vulnerability, depression, BMI, and contact with the healthcare system were associated with survivors' smoking behavior. Discussions/Conclusions: A large proportion of the sample was nicotine dependent, yet motivated to quit. Individual- interpersonal- and environmental-level factors were associated with survivors' smoking behavior. Smoking is particularly dangerous for childhood and young adult cancer survivors. This population may benefit from a smoking cessation intervention designed to build self-efficacy and address other known predictors of smoking behavior.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1186/1471-2407-11-165en_US
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3114793/en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.titleDisseminating a Smoking Cessation Intervention to Childhood and Young Adult Cancer Survivors: Baseline Characteristics and Study Design of the Partnership for Health-2 Studyen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalBMC Canceren_US
dash.depositing.authorEmmons, Karen Maria
dc.date.available2012-04-15T18:53:43Z
dash.affiliation.otherSPH^Dean's Office Administrationen_US
dash.affiliation.otherSPH^Society Human Development and Healthen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2407-11-165*
dash.authorsorderedfalse
dash.contributor.affiliatedGreenberg, Mark
dash.contributor.affiliatedDiller, Lisa
dash.contributor.affiliatedEmmons, Karen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record