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dc.contributor.authorNaidoo, Nasheen
dc.contributor.authorChen, Cynthia
dc.contributor.authorRebello, Salome A.
dc.contributor.authorSpeer, Karl
dc.contributor.authorTai, E. Shyong
dc.contributor.authorLee, Jeanette
dc.contributor.authorBuchmann, Sandra
dc.contributor.authorKoelling-Speer, Isabelle
dc.contributor.authorvan Dam, Rob M.
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-28T15:22:47Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationNaidoo, Nasheen, Cynthia Chen, Salome A. Rebello, Karl Speer, E. Shyong Tai, Jeanette Lee, Sandra Buchmann, Isabelle Koelling-Speer, and Rob M. van Dam. 2011. Cholesterol-raising diterpenes in types of coffee commonly consumed in Singapore, Indonesia and India and associations with blood lipids: A survey and cross sectional study. Nutrition Journal 10(1): 48.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1475-2891en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:8808826
dc.description.abstractBackground: To measure the content of cholesterol-raising diterpenes in coffee sold at the retailer level in Singapore, Indonesia and India and to determine the relationship of coffee consumption with lipid levels in a population-based study in Singapore. Methods: Survey and cross-sectional study in local coffee shops in Singapore, Indonesia and India to measure the diterpene content in coffee, and a population-based study in Singapore to examine the relationship of coffee consumption and blood lipid levels. Interviews and coffee samples (n = 27) were collected from coffee shops in Singapore, Indonesia and India. In addition, 3000 men and women who were Chinese, Malay, and Indian residents of Singapore participated in a cross-sectional study. Results and Discussion: The traditional 'sock' method of coffee preparation used in Singapore resulted in cafestol concentrations comparable to European paper drip filtered coffee (mean 0.09 ± SD 0.064 mg/cup). This amount would result in negligible predicted increases in serum cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations. Similarly low amounts of cafestol were found in Indian 'filter' coffee that used a metal mesh filter (0.05 ± 0.05 mg/cup). Coffee samples from Indonesia using the 'sock' method (0.85 ± 0.41 mg/cup) or a metal mesh filter (0.98 mg/cup) contained higher amounts of cafestol comparable to espresso coffee. Unfiltered coffee from Indonesia contained an amount of cafestol (4.43 mg/cup) similar to Scandinavian boiled, Turkish and French press coffee with substantial predicted increases in serum cholesterol (0.33 mmol/l) and triglycerides (0.20 mmol/l) concentrations for consumption of 5 cups per day. In the Singaporean population, higher coffee consumption was not substantially associated with serum lipid concentrations after adjustment for potential confounders [LDL-cholesterol: 3.07 (95% confidence interval 2.97-3.18) for <1 cup/week versus 3.12 (2.99-3.26) for ≥ 3 cups/day; p trend 0.12]. Conclusions: Based on the low levels of diterpenes found in traditionally prepared coffee consumed in Singapore and India, coffee consumption in these countries does not appear to be a risk factor for elevation of serum cholesterol, whereas samples tested from Indonesia showed mixed results depending on the type of preparation method used.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1186/1475-2891-10-48en_US
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3115845en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.titleCholesterol-Raising Diterpenes in Types of Coffee Commonly Consumed in Singapore, Indonesia and India and Associations with Blood Lipids: A Survey and Cross Sectional Studyen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalNutrition Journalen_US
dash.depositing.authorvan Dam, Rob M.
dc.date.available2012-05-28T15:22:47Z
dash.affiliation.otherSPH^Nutritionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1475-2891-10-48*
dash.contributor.affiliatedVan Dam, Rob


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