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dc.contributor.advisorHutt, Peter Bartonen_US
dc.contributor.authorStout, Laura P.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-07T03:10:47Z
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.citationLet Them Eat Cake? A Historical Analysis of FDA's Decision to Approve Aspartame (1997 Third Year Paper)en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:8846766
dc.description.abstractThat sugar occupies a cherished role in the human diet hardly needs mention. After all, nearly 2,500 tastebuds located at the tip of the human tongue are dedicated to the pursuit of sweetness. The first recorded mention of sugar, a description of a crown of glistening sugar crystals, dates back to a sacred Hindu text from 800 B.C. Of course, the sumptuous deserts and candies which fulfill our sugar cravings come at a high caloric cost, a cost which has become less and less affordable to the growing millions who seek to watch their weight. As far back as the mid 1800's, people recognized the tension between the desire to eat delicious foods, and the often contravening desire to eat healthfully. It is not surprising, therefore, that the intersection of the dietary movement with the human sweet tooth would eventually lead to a demand for low calorie artificial sweeteners.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectFood and Drug Lawen
dc.subjectfood safetyen
dc.subjecttoxicityen
dc.subjectfood additivesen
dc.subjectaspartameen
dc.subjectFDAen
dc.titleLet Them Eat Cake? A Historical Analysis of FDA's Decision to Approve Aspartameen
dc.typePaper (for course/seminar/workshop)en_US
dc.date.available2012-06-07T03:10:47Z
dash.authorsorderedfalse


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