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dc.contributor.advisorHutt, Peter Bartonen_US
dc.contributor.authorBerniker, Jessamyn S.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-07T05:41:40Z
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.citationSpontaneous Reporting Systems: Achieving Less Spontaneity and More Reporting (2001 Third Year Paper)en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:8846816
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this article is to highlight and analyze possible improvements to spontaneous reporting systems, in particular, and drug safety, in general. Part I of this article will provide a background on adverse drug reactions and spontaneous reporting systems, with particular emphasis on the MedWatch reporting system currently used in the United States. Part II will discuss physician attitudinal studies performed worldwide that have attempted to highlight the reasons for the underreporting of adverse reactions and problems with reporting systems. Part III will analyze problems identified with spontaneous reporting systems and potential improvements of them.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectFood and Drug Lawen
dc.subjectdrug safetyen
dc.subjectadverse drug reactionsen
dc.subjectMedWatchen
dc.subjectspontaneous reporting systemsen
dc.titleSpontaneous Reporting Systems: Achieving Less Spontaneity and More Reportingen
dc.typePaper (for course/seminar/workshop)en_US
dc.date.available2012-06-07T05:41:40Z
dash.authorsorderedfalse


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