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dc.contributor.authorNajmi, Sadia
dc.contributor.authorRiemann, Bradley
dc.contributor.authorWegner, Daniel M.
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-18T18:02:19Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationNajmi, Sadia, Bradley C. Riemann, and Daniel M. Wegner. 2009 Managing unwanted intrusive thoughts in obsessive compulsive disorder: relative effectiveness of suppression, distraction, and acceptance. Behaviour Research and Therapy 47(6): 494-503.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0005-7967en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:9275580
dc.description.abstractSuppression is one of various mental control techniques that people may use to manage unwanted thoughts. Evidence suggests that it is at best unsustainable and at worst counterproductive. This leads to the question: If suppression is a futile way to respond to unwanted, intrusive, thoughts, what is a more effective alternative? In the current study, we evaluated the relative effectiveness of suppression and two alternative mental control techniques—focused distraction and acceptance—on the frequency of intrusions and distress associated with them. Results support the claim that suppression is a counterproductive technique for dealing with unwanted, intrusive thoughts in OCD. However, the harmfulness of suppression was reflected primarily in the magnitude of distress and not in intrusion frequency. Focused distraction and acceptance were the more effective techniques for managing clinically significant intrusive thoughts. We discuss implications for the cognitive treatment for OCD.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipPsychologyen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1016/j.brat.2009.02.015en_US
dash.licenseOAP
dc.subjectobsessive-compulsive disorderen_US
dc.subjectsuppressionen_US
dc.subjectdistractionen_US
dc.subjectacceptanceen_US
dc.subjectintrusive thoughtsen_US
dc.titleManaging Unwanted Intrusive Thoughts In Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: Relative Effectiveness Of Suppression, Focused-Distraction, and Acceptanceen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscripten_US
dc.relation.journalBehaviour Research and Therapyen_US
dash.depositing.authorWegner, Daniel M.
dc.date.available2012-07-18T18:02:19Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.brat.2009.02.015*
dash.contributor.affiliatedWegner, Daniel


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