SRPK2 Phosphorylation by the AGC Kinases, and mTORC1 Regulation of Alternative Splicing

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SRPK2 Phosphorylation by the AGC Kinases, and mTORC1 Regulation of Alternative Splicing

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Title: SRPK2 Phosphorylation by the AGC Kinases, and mTORC1 Regulation of Alternative Splicing
Author: Dempsey, Jamie Michelle
Citation: Dempsey, Jamie Michelle. 2012. SRPK2 Phosphorylation by the AGC Kinases, and mTORC1 Regulation of Alternative Splicing. Doctoral dissertation, Harvard University.
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Abstract: The mechanisms through which a cell controls its proliferation, differentiation, metabolism, motility, and ultimate survival in response to extracellular cues are largely controlled by the Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Ras-ERK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K-mTOR) signaling pathways. Originally delineated as two separate and linear signaling pathways, multitudes of evidence through experimentation have shown that these pathways can co-regulate downstream targets and cellular outcomes. Here, we provide evidence for an additional point of pathway convergence the serine/arginine protein kinase 2 (SRPK2). Originally identified as a target of the mTORC1/S6K signaling pathway, we have shown SRPK2 to be a target of the Ras-ERK-Rsk pathway, as well as the PI3K-AKT. We discovered the S6K, AKT and RSK all phosphorylate SRPK2 at serine 494 in a cell-type, stimulus dependent manner, emphasizing the redundant nature of the AGC kinases. SRPK2 regulates the phosphorylation of the constitutive and alternative splicing factors the SR proteins. This led us to question mTORC1 involvement in splice site selection, and we discovered several alternative splicing events downstream of mTORC1 signaling. We found that the protein levels of the splicing factors ASF/SF2 and hnRNPa2b1 are regulated by mTORC1 signaling, and we hypothesize this is through regulated unproductive splicing and translation (RUST). Interestingly, we found that BIN1, a target of both ASF/SF2 and hnRNPa2b1, is alternatively spliced, following modulations in mTORC1 signaling. These biochemical studies and knowledge gleaned from them will lead to a better understanding of how the cell can regulate protein expression by controlling alternative splicing.
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Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:9817664
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