Spasms of the Soul: The Tanganyika Laughter Epidemic in the Age of Independence

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Spasms of the Soul: The Tanganyika Laughter Epidemic in the Age of Independence

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: Spasms of the Soul: The Tanganyika Laughter Epidemic in the Age of Independence
Author: Nasser, Latif Shiraz
Citation: Nasser, Latif Shiraz. 2014. Spasms of the Soul: The Tanganyika Laughter Epidemic in the Age of Independence. Doctoral dissertation, Harvard University.
Access Status: Full text of the requested work is not available in DASH at this time (“dark deposit”). For more information on dark deposits, see our FAQ.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: 1962. Tanganyika, East Africa. In a rural boarding school on the shore of Lake Victoria, dozens of adolescent girls began to laugh and cry uncontrollably. After trying to stem these mysterious breakouts for a month and a half, school officials gave up and sent everyone home. As the girls fanned out to their homes across the region, their behaviors spread too. Over 1000 people were affected. Families and governments enlisted all kinds of experts to give them a clue about what was going on. Eventually, an official diagnosis: mass hysteria. About two years after it began, the epidemic petered out. Nobody died. Everybody recovered.
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12274127
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters