Mutualistic interaction between Salmonella enterica and Aspergillus niger and its effects on Zea mays colonization

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Mutualistic interaction between Salmonella enterica and Aspergillus niger and its effects on Zea mays colonization

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Title: Mutualistic interaction between Salmonella enterica and Aspergillus niger and its effects on Zea mays colonization
Author: Balbontín, Roberto; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

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Citation: Balbontín, Roberto, Hera Vlamakis, and Roberto Kolter. 2014. “Mutualistic interaction between Salmonella enterica and Aspergillus niger and its effects on Zea mays colonization.” Microbial Biotechnology 7 (6): 589-600. doi:10.1111/1751-7915.12182. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1751-7915.12182.
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Abstract: Salmonella Typhimurium inhabits a variety of environments and is able to infect a broad range of hosts. Throughout its life cycle, some hosts can act as intermediates in the path to the infection of others. Aspergillus niger is a ubiquitous fungus that can often be found in soil or associated to plants and microbial consortia. Recently, S. Typhimurium was shown to establish biofilms on the hyphae of A. niger. In this work, we have found that this interaction is stable for weeks without a noticeable negative effect on either organism. Indeed, bacterial growth is promoted upon the establishment of the interaction. Moreover, bacterial biofilms protect the fungus from external insults such as the effects of the anti-fungal agent cycloheximide. Thus, the Salmonella–Aspergillus interaction can be defined as mutualistic. A tripartite gnotobiotic system involving the bacterium, the fungus and a plant revealed that co-colonization has a greater negative effect on plant growth than colonization by either organism in dividually. Strikingly, co-colonization also causes a reduction in plant invasion by S. Typhimurium. This work demonstrates that S. Typhimurium and A. niger establish a mutualistic interaction that alters bacterial colonization of plants and affects plant physiology.
Published Version: doi:10.1111/1751-7915.12182
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4265077/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:13581014
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