Life-Cycle Labor-Force Participation of Married Women: Historical Evidence and Implications

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Life-Cycle Labor-Force Participation of Married Women: Historical Evidence and Implications

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Title: Life-Cycle Labor-Force Participation of Married Women: Historical Evidence and Implications
Author: Goldin, Claudia
Citation: Goldin, Claudia. 1989. Life-cycle labor-force participation of married women: Historical evidence and implications. Journal of Labor Economics 7(1): 20-47.
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Abstract: The seven-fold increase, since 1920, in the labor force participation rate of married women was not accompanied by a substantial increase in average work experience among employed married women. Two data sets giving life-cycle labor-force histories for cohorts of women born from the 1880s to 1910s indicate considerable (unconditional) heterogeneity in labor-force participation. Employed married women had substantial attachment to their jobs; increased participation brought in women with little prior work experience. Average work experience among cross sections of employed married women increased from 9.1 to 10.5 years over the 1930-50 period. Implications for "wage discrimination" are discussed.
Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/298197
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:2656816
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