The effects of energy paths and emission controls and standards on future trends in China's emissions of primary air pollutants

DSpace/Manakin Repository

The effects of energy paths and emission controls and standards on future trends in China's emissions of primary air pollutants

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: The effects of energy paths and emission controls and standards on future trends in China's emissions of primary air pollutants
Author: Zhao, Y.; Zhang, J.; Nielsen, Chris

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Zhao, Y., J. Zhang, and C. P. Nielsen. 2014. “The Effects of Energy Paths and Emission Controls and Standards on Future Trends in China’s Emissions of Primary Air Pollutants.” Atmos. Chem. Phys. 14 (17) (September 1): 8849–8868. doi:10.5194/acp-14-8849-2014.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: To examine the efficacy of China’s actions to control atmospheric pollution, three levels of growth of energy consumption and three levels of implementation of emission controls are estimated, generating a total of nine combined activity-emission control scenarios that are then used to estimate trends of national emissions of primary air pollutants through 2030. The emission control strategies are expected to have more effects than the energy paths on the future emission trends for all the concerned pollutants. As recently promulgated national action plans of air pollution prevention and control (NAPAPPC) are implemented, China’s anthropogenic pollutant emissions should decline. For example, the emissions of SO2, NOx, total suspended particles (TSP), PM10, and PM2.5 are estimated to decline 7, 20, 41, 34, and 31 % from 2010 to 2030, respectively, in the “best guess” scenario that includes national commitment of energy saving policy and implementation of NAPAPPC. Should the issued/proposed emission standards be fully achieved, a less likely scenario, annual emissions would be further reduced, ranging from 17 (for primary PM2.5) to 29 % (for NOx) declines in 2015, and the analogue numbers would be 12 and 24 % in 2030. The uncertainties of emission projections result mainly from the uncertain operational conditions of swiftly proliferating air pollutant control devices and lack of detailed information about emission control plans by region. The predicted emission trends by sector and chemical species raise concerns about current pollution control strategies: the potential for emissions abatement in key sectors may be declining due to the near saturation of emission control devices use; risks of ecosystem acidification could rise because emissions of alkaline base cations may be declining faster than those of SO2; and radiative forcing could rise because emissions of positive-forcing carbonaceous aerosols may decline more slowly than those of SO2 emissions and thereby concentrations of negative-forcing sulfate particles. Expanded control of emissions of fine particles and carbonaceous aerosols from small industrial and residential sources is recommended, and a more comprehensive emission control strategy targeting a wider range of pollutants (volatile organic compounds, NH3 and CO, etc.) and taking account of more diverse environmental impacts is also urgently needed.
Published Version: doi:10.5194/acp-14-8849-2014
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:28352016
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters