Genetic associations with subjective well-being also implicate depression and neuroticism

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Genetic associations with subjective well-being also implicate depression and neuroticism

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Title: Genetic associations with subjective well-being also implicate depression and neuroticism
Author: Okbay, Aysu; Baselmans, Bart M. L.; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Turley, Patrick Ansel; Nivard, Michel G.; Fontana, Mark A.; Meddens, Fleur S. W.; Linnér, Richard Karlsson; Rietveld, Cornelius A.; Derringer, Jaime; Gratten, Jacob; Lee, James J.; Liu, Jimmy Z.; de Vlaming, Ronald; Conley, Dalton C.; Smith, George Davey; Hofman, Albert; Johannesson, Magnus; Laibson, David I.; Medland, Sarah E.; Meyer, Michelle N.; Pickrell, Joseph; Esko, Tonu; Krueger, Robert F.; Beauchamp, Jonathan Pierre; Koellinger, Philipp D.; Benjamin, Daniel J.; Bartels, Meike; Cesarini, David; Benjamin, Daniel; Bartels, Meike; Koellinger, Philipp

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Okbay, Aysu, Bart M.L. Baselmans, Jan-Emmanuel De Neve, et al.. 2016. Genetic associations with subjective well-being also implicate depression and neuroticism. Nature Genetics 48: 624–633
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Abstract: We conducted a genome-wide association study of subjective well-being (SWB) in 298,420 individuals. We also performed auxiliary analyses of depressive symptoms (“DS”; N = 161,460) and neuroticism (N = 170,910), both of which have a substantial genetic correlation with SWB (휌̂≈−0.8). We identify three SNPs associated with SWB at genome-wide significance. Two of them are significantly associated with DS in an independent sample. In our auxiliary analyses, we identify 13 additional genome-wide-significant associations: two with DS and eleven with neuroticism, including two inversion polymorphisms. Across our phenotypes, loci regulating expression in central nervous system and adrenal/pancreas tissues are enriched. The discovery of genetic loci associated with the three phenotypes we study has proven elusive; our findings illustrate the payoffs from studying them jointly.
Published Version: 10.1038/ng.3552
Other Sources: http://biorxiv.org/content/early/2015/11/24/032789
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:32303189
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