China's CO2 emissions estimated from the bottom up: Recent trends, spatial distributions, and quantification of uncertainties

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China's CO2 emissions estimated from the bottom up: Recent trends, spatial distributions, and quantification of uncertainties

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Title: China's CO2 emissions estimated from the bottom up: Recent trends, spatial distributions, and quantification of uncertainties
Author: Zhao, Yu; Nielsen, Chris; McElroy, Michael Brendon

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Citation: Zhao, Yu, Chris P. Nielsen, and Michael B. McElroy. 2012. “China’s CO2 Emissions Estimated from the Bottom up: Recent Trends, Spatial Distributions, and Quantification of Uncertainties.” Atmospheric Environment 59 (November): 214–223. doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2012.05.027.
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Abstract: China’s emissions of anthropogenic CO2 are estimated using a bottom-up emission inventory framework based on a detailed categorization of economic sectors and provincial economic and energy data. It includes a newly compiled database of CO2 emission factors employing the latest field study results from China. Total annual emissions are estimated to have risen from 7126 to 9370 Mt CO2 from 2005 to 2009. Recent policies to conserve energy and reduce emissions have been effective in limiting CO2 emissions from power and iron & steel plants, but have had little effect on those from cement production. The uncertainties of China’s CO2 emissions are quantified for the first time using Monte-Carlo simulation, producing a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 9% to þ11% for total emissions in 2005. The largest contributors to sector-level emission uncertainty are emission factors for most industrial sources and activity levels for power plants, transportation, and residential & commercial sources. Application of province-level energy consumption and China-specific emission factors in some sectors results in higher annual emission estimates for 2005-2008 as compared with other studies, although most of those are within the 95% CIs of this study
Published Version: doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2012.05.027
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:34730514
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