Defective NKT Cell Activation by CD1d+ TRAMP Prostate Tumor Cells Is Corrected by Interleukin-12 with alpha-Galactosylceramide

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Defective NKT Cell Activation by CD1d+ TRAMP Prostate Tumor Cells Is Corrected by Interleukin-12 with alpha-Galactosylceramide

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Title: Defective NKT Cell Activation by CD1d+ TRAMP Prostate Tumor Cells Is Corrected by Interleukin-12 with alpha-Galactosylceramide
Author: Nowak, Michael; Tun-Kyi, Adrian; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo; Arredouani, Mohammed S.; Sanda, Martin George; Balk, Steven Paul; Exley, Mark Adrian

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Citation: Nowak, Michael, Mohammed S. Arredouani, Adrian Tun-Kyi, Ingo Schmidt-Wolf, Martin G. Sanda, Steven P. Balk, and Mark A. Exley. 2010. Defective NKT Cell Activation by CD1d+ TRAMP Prostate Tumor Cells Is Corrected by Interleukin-12 with alpha-Galactosylceramide. PLoS ONE 5(6): e11311.
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Abstract: Numerical and functional defects of invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT) have been documented in human and mouse cancers, resulting in a defect in IFN production in several malignancies. iNKT cells recognize glycolipids presented on CD1d molecules by dendritic and related cells, leading to their activation and thereby regulating immune reactions. Activated iNKT cells cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity can inhibit existing and spontaneous tumor growth, progression, and metastasis. We have identified functional iNKT cell defects in the murine TRAMP prostate cancer model. We found that iNKT cells show the ability to migrate into TRAMP prostate tumors. This infiltration was mediated through CCL2: CCR5 chemokine: receptor interaction. Prostate tumor cells expressing CD1d partially activated iNKT cells, as appreciated by up-regulation of CD25, PD-1 and the IL-12R. However, despite inducing up-regulation of these activation markers and, hence, delivering positive signals, prostate tumor cells inhibited the IL-12-induced STAT4 phosphorylation in a cell-cell contact dependent but CD1d-independent manner. Consequently, tumor cells did not induce secretion of IFNγ by iNKT cells. Blocking the inhibitory Ly49 receptor on iNKT cells in the presence of α-GalCer restored their IFNγ production in vivo and in vitro. However, Ly49 blockade alone was not sufficient. Importantly, this defect could be also be reversed into vigorous secretion of IFNγ by the addition of both IL-12 and the exogenous CD1d ligand alpha-galactosylceramide, but not by IL-12 alone, both in vivo and in vitro. These data underscore the potential to optimize iNKT-based therapeutic approaches.
Published Version: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0011311
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2892484/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4725501

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