Meeting Report: Measuring Endocrine-Sensitive Endpoints within the First Years of Life

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Meeting Report: Measuring Endocrine-Sensitive Endpoints within the First Years of Life

Citable link to this page

. . . . . .

Title: Meeting Report: Measuring Endocrine-Sensitive Endpoints within the First Years of Life
Author: Arbuckle, Tye E.; Swan, Shanna H.; Mao, Catherine S.; Longnecker, Matthew P.; Main, Katharina M.; Whyatt, Robin M.; Mendola, Pauline; Rovet, Joanne; Till, Christine; Wade, Mike; Jarrell, John; Matthews, Stephen; Van Vliet, Guy; Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf; Mieusset, Roger; Hauser, Russ B.; Legrand, Melissa

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Arbuckle, Tye E., Russ Hauser, Shanna H. Swan, Catherine S. Mao, Matthew P. Longnecker, Katharina M. Main, Robin M. Whyatt, et al. 2008. Meeting report: Measuring endocrine-sensitive endpoints within the first years of life. Environmental Health Perspectives 116(7): 948-951.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: An international workshop titled “Assessing Endocrine-Related Endpoints within the First Years of Life” was held 30 April–1 May 2007, in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Representatives from a number of pregnancy cohort studies in North America and Europe presented options for measuring various endocrine-sensitive endpoints in early life and discussed issues related to performing and using those measures. The workshop focused on measuring reproductive tract developmental endpoints [e.g., anogenital distance (AGD)], endocrine status, and infant anthropometry. To the extent possible, workshop participants strove to develop or recommend standardized measurements that would allow comparisons and pooling of data across studies. The recommended outcomes include thigh fat fold, breast size, vaginal cytology, AGD, location of the testis, testicular size, and growth of the penis, with most of the discussion focusing on the genital exam. Although a number of outcome measures recommended during the genital exam have been associated with exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals, little is known about how predictive these effects are of later reproductive health or other chronic health conditions.
Published Version: doi:10.1289/ehp.11226
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2453165/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:5978682

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters