Genome analysis reveals insights into physiology and longevity of the Brandt’s bat Myotis brandtii

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Genome analysis reveals insights into physiology and longevity of the Brandt’s bat Myotis brandtii

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Title: Genome analysis reveals insights into physiology and longevity of the Brandt’s bat Myotis brandtii
Author: Seim, Inge; Fang, Xiaodong; Xiong, Zhiqiang; Lobanov, Alexey V.; Huang, Zhiyong; Ma, Siming; Feng, Yue; Turanov, Anton A.; Zhu, Yabing; Lenz, Tobias L.; Gerashchenko, Maxim V.; Fan, Dingding; Hee Yim, Sun; Yao, Xiaoming; Jordan, Daniel; Xiong, Yingqi; Ma, Yong; Lyapunov, Andrey N.; Chen, Guanxing; Kulakova, Oksana I.; Sun, Yudong; Lee, Sang-Goo; Bronson, Roderick T.; Moskalev, Alexey A.; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; Zhang, Guojie; Krogh, Anders; Wang, Jun; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Seim, I., X. Fang, Z. Xiong, A. V. Lobanov, Z. Huang, S. Ma, Y. Feng, et al. 2013. “Genome analysis reveals insights into physiology and longevity of the Brandt’s bat Myotis brandtii.” Nature Communications 4 (1): 2212. doi:10.1038/ncomms3212. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms3212.
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Abstract: Bats account for one-fifth of mammalian species, are the only mammals with powered flight, and are among the few animals that echolocate. The insect-eating Brandt’s bat (Myotis brandtii) is the longest-lived bat species known to date (lifespan exceeds 40 years) and, at 4–8 g adult body weight, is the most extreme mammal with regard to disparity between body mass and longevity. Here we report sequencing and analysis of the Brandt’s bat genome and transcriptome, which suggest adaptations consistent with echolocation and hibernation, as well as altered metabolism, reproduction and visual function. Unique sequence changes in growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptors are also observed. The data suggest that an altered growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 axis, which may be common to other long-lived bat species, together with adaptations such as hibernation and low reproductive rate, contribute to the exceptional lifespan of the Brandt’s bat.
Published Version: doi:10.1038/ncomms3212
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3753542/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11855714
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