Education, Complaints, and Accountability

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Education, Complaints, and Accountability

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Title: Education, Complaints, and Accountability
Author: Botero, Juan; Ponce, Alejandro; Shleifer, Andrei

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Citation: Botero, Juan, Alejandro Ponce, and Andrei Shleifer. 2013. “Education, Complaints, and Accountability.” Journal of Law and Economics 56 (4) (November): 959–996. doi:10.1086/674133. http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/674133.
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Abstract: Better-educated countries have better governments, an empirical regularity that holds in both dictatorships and democracies. Possible reasons for this fact are that educated people are more likely to complain about misconduct by government officials and that more frequent complaints encourage better behavior from officials. Newly assembled individual-level survey data from the World Justice Project show that, within countries, better-educated people are more likely to report official misconduct. The results are confirmed using other survey data on reporting crime and corruption. Citizens’ complaints might thus be an operative mechanism that explains the link between education and the quality of government.
Published Version: doi:10.1086/674133
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Open Access Policy Articles, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#OAP
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11880346
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