Obesity susceptibility loci and uncontrolled eating, emotional eating and cognitive restraint behaviors in men and women

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Obesity susceptibility loci and uncontrolled eating, emotional eating and cognitive restraint behaviors in men and women

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: Obesity susceptibility loci and uncontrolled eating, emotional eating and cognitive restraint behaviors in men and women
Author: Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Rimm, Eric B.; Curhan, Gary C.; Kraft, Peter; Hunter, David J.; Hu, Frank B.; van Dam, Rob M.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Cornelis, Marilyn C., Eric B. Rimm, Gary C. Curhan, Peter Kraft, David J. Hunter, Frank B. Hu, and Rob M. van Dam. 2013. “Obesity susceptibility loci and uncontrolled eating, emotional eating and cognitive restraint behaviors in men and women.” Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) 22 (5): E135-E141. doi:10.1002/oby.20592. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/oby.20592.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Objective: Many confirmed genetic loci for obesity are expressed in regions of the brain that regulate energy intake and reward-seeking behavior. Whether these loci contribute to the development of specific eating behaviors has not been investigated. We examined the relationship between a genetic susceptibility to obesity and cognitive restraint, uncontrolled and emotional eating. Design and Methods Eating behavior and body mass index (BMI) were determined by questionnaires for 1471 men and 2381 women from two U.S cohorts. Genotypes were extracted from genome-wide scans and a genetic-risk score (GRS) derived from 32 obesity-loci was calculated. Results: The GRS was positively associated with emotional and uncontrolled eating(P<0.002). In exploratory analysis, BMI-increasing variants of MTCH2, TNNI3K and ZC3H4 were positively associated with emotional eating and those of TNNI3K and ZC3H4 were positively associated with uncontrolled eating. The BMI-increasing variant of FTO was positively and those of LRP1B and TFAP2B were inversely associated with cognitive restraint. These associations for single SNPs were independent of BMI but were not significant after multiple-testing correction. Conclusions: An overall genetic susceptibility to obesity may also extend to eating behaviors. The link between specific loci and obesity may be mediated by eating behavior but larger studies are warranted to confirm these results.
Published Version: doi:10.1002/oby.20592
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3858422/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:13454658
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters